Nissan Mimics Fish In Crash-Avoidance Technology

Researchers at Nissan have been studying how quickly and how closely individual fish can swim together without bumping into each other. Last week, at a technology show outside Tokyo, the carmaker unveiled a group of little robots that mimic fish, using hi-tech wizardry that could end up in future vehicles.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is fish out of water and on the road.

If you've ever looked at a school of fish, you may have noticed how quickly and how closely individual fish can swim together without bumping into each other. Researchers at Nissan have been studying this. Last week, at a technology show outside Tokyo, the carmaker unveiled a group of little robots that mimic fish, using hi-tech wizardry that could end up in future vehicles.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The robots were embedded with technologies that allow them to see and sense how others are moving around them. Nissan says the goal is to create crash-free cars and contribute to a, quote, "environmentally friendly and traffic jam-free driving environment." But don't expect to see crash-free cars on the road anytime soon. It may take some time to perfect the technology. You know, bear in mind the differences here. A fish in a school of fish is rarely distracted by an iPhone or a rambunctious child.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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