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Bardot Calls For Canadian Maple Syrup Boycott

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Bardot Calls For Canadian Maple Syrup Boycott

Business

Bardot Calls For Canadian Maple Syrup Boycott

Bardot Calls For Canadian Maple Syrup Boycott

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113957480/113957453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Actress Brigitte Bardot is calling for a boycott of maple syrup from Canada, the world's dominant supplier of maple syrup. The actress turned animal rights activist wants animal lovers to boycott Canada's syrup until the country bans seal hunting.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And the weak dollar may be helping American maple syrup makers. Someone else who might be helping is French actress Brigitte Bardot. Our Last Word in business is Oh, Canada.

Our neighbor to the north still dominates the world supply of maple syrup, as we just heard. But the French film legend has called for a boycott of Canadian maple syrup to protest Canadian seal hunting. There's no link between seals and maple syrup, but they're hoping they might convince the Canadian government to ban seal hunting by targeting this iconic Canadian symbol.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

I'm Renee Montagne.

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