Business

Barnes & Noble Unveils Electronic-Book Reader

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The latest e-reader is called the Nook and it's from Barnes & Noble. Unveiled Tuesday in New York, it is the same size as its main rival the Amazon Kindle. It costs $259 — the same price as the Kindle. The Nook is hoping to lure consumers with new bells and whistles, like a color screen and the ability to share a book with a friend for two weeks.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with another digital reader.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: So many e-reading devices are piling onto the market that you might need a new bookshelf to store them all. Of course most people just buy one of those machines, so companies are vying for that purchase.

Barnes & Noble unveiled the latest e-reader just yesterday and it is called The Nook. It's the same size and the same price as its main rival, Amazon's Kindle - about $260. The Nook is hoping to lure consumers with new bells and whistles, like a color screen and the ability to share a book with a friend for two weeks.

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