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Video: How A Virus Invades Your Body

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Video: How A Virus Invades Your Body

Health

Video: How A Virus Invades Your Body

Video: How A Virus Invades Your Body

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114156779/114156740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

If flu vaccines are in short supply, it's especially important to know who's getting sick and where. At NPR.ORG/health, there's a video that shows how a virus invades the body.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

So, that's the big picture on the swine flu vaccine. And if you're able to go our Web site later today, as you're checking the headlines, NPR.org, you can get the small picture - really small.

Here's NPR's Robert Krulwich.

ROBERT KRULWICH: Thanks. So, if flu viruses are in short supply, it's especially important to know who is getting sick and where. And for that, you can look at a CDC map called the Flu View. But we at NPR, we have gone one step further. We have created an animation. It's called the Flu View of You - a video - that shows...

(Soundbite of sneezing)

KRULWICH: �yeah, a sneeze carrying a flu virus up a nose, down a throat - and this you can't see anywhere else. You can watch the virus slip into one of your cells and trick the molecules inside to make a million new viruses. It's strangely beautiful and a little bit scary.

So, to see for yourself, just go to NPR.org/Health.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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