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Floridians Try Nutty Way To Their Save Post Office

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Floridians Try Nutty Way To Their Save Post Office

Business

Floridians Try Nutty Way To Their Save Post Office

Floridians Try Nutty Way To Their Save Post Office

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114308718/114308688" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Residents of Lantana, Fla., think the Postal Service would have to be nuts to close their post office. They have been mailing coconuts to Postmaster General John Potter along with requests to keep their post office open. It costs about $4 to mail a coconut. Postal officials say they have received hundred of them.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Budget cuts are forcing many post offices to close, and one community in South Florida is so distressed about the potential loss of its post office that it sent a message to Washington, D.C.

And that's our last word in business today: first class coconut.

Residents in the town of Lantana mailed 500 coconuts to the postmaster general and hundreds more on the way - maybe up to 2,000. Apparently you can mail a coconut without packaging through the U.S. mail. It's already packaged. Just make sure the address is taped on securely and it will cost you about $4 a nut.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE, MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

(Soundbite of song, "Coconut")

Mr. HARRY NILSSON (Singer/Songwriter): (Singing) Bruder bought a coconut, he bought it for a dime. His sister had another one she paid it for de lime. She put de lime in de coconut...

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