Foreign Policy: America Finds An Ally In Palau

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Aerial view of Palau Cpaital building in Melekeok, Palau i

Aerial view of the Palau Capital building in Melekeok, Palau, June 2009. Itsuo Inouye/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Itsuo Inouye/AP
Aerial view of Palau Cpaital building in Melekeok, Palau

Aerial view of the Palau Capital building in Melekeok, Palau, June 2009.

Itsuo Inouye/AP

Only two countries supported the United States in a U.N. General Assembly vote condemning the embargo on Cuba Wednesday: Israel (not exactly a surprise) and Palau. While these votes do little more than force commentators to write that "virtually the entire world opposes the embargo" rather than "literally the entire world opposes the embargo," it is interesting to see how Palau seems to be going out of its way to support the United States's most controversial policies.

Remember, Palau famously joined the "coalition of the willing," supporting the invation of Iraq (despite not having a military) and agreed to take in Uighur detainees from Guantanamo Bay. (Granted, Palau was a U.S. protectorate until 1994 and still depends on the U.S. military for its defense.)

It would be nice to think that the U.S. might return the favor by taking significant action to prevent the global climate change that is literally wiping Palau off the map.

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