Study: Doctors' Chit-Chat Hinders Patients A new study — "Physician Self-disclosure in Primary Care Visits: Enough About You, What About Me?" — finds that doctors often talk about themselves in the course of seeing patients, and that, rather than being helpful, the chit-chat often gets in the way.
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Study: Doctors' Chit-Chat Hinders Patients

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Study: Doctors' Chit-Chat Hinders Patients

Study: Doctors' Chit-Chat Hinders Patients

Study: Doctors' Chit-Chat Hinders Patients

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11433237/11433242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study finds that doctors often talk about their lives and their hobbies in the course of seeing their patients, and that, rather than being helpful, the chit-chat often gets in the way.

The study — "Physician Self-disclosure in Primary Care Visits: Enough About You, What About Me?" — is published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Its lead author, Dr. Susan McDaniel of the University of Rochester School of Medicine, talks with Robert Siegel.

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