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'Dirty' Bomb

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'Dirty' Bomb

'Dirty' Bomb

'Dirty' Bomb

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1144797/144797" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. authorities have arrested Jose Padilla and accused him of plotting with al Qaeda to detonate a "dirty" bomb in the United States. But they say Padilla, or Abdullah al Muhajir, was only in the initial phases of preparing the radiation bomb. While dirty bombs might fuel mass terror, NPR's Steve Inskeep found experts who say they are not easy to make or use, and they may not cause as much damage as some fear.

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