Web Site Strips Log-In Hassle

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BugMeNot.com is the name of an Australian Web site that generates log-ins for Web sites that require users to fill in personal or demographic information. It has worked out how to get around registering on more than 160,000 sites. It lists some high-minded reasons such as it's a breach of privacy, and it's contrary to the fundamental spirit of the Net. But the other reason is simply "it's annoying as hell."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Many people struggle to remember all the passwords in their lives. And then, of course, there's the information that is demanded of you when you go onto somebody else's Web site. Which is why today's last word in business is BugMeNot. Three words, actually. It's the name of an Australian Web site.

If you get to one of those Web sites that forces you to fill in personal or demographic information, BugMeNot generates ways around it. It has worked out how to get around registering on more than 160,000 sites. It lists some high-minded reasons for this, like it's a breach of privacy to demand the information or it's contrary to the fundamental spirit of the Net. But the other reason listed is simply, quote, "giving this information is annoying as hell."

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