Remembering Tuskegee Some 30 years ago, a public health investigator overheard a story about a doctor being reprimanded for treating an elderly black man with syphilis. The investigator had stumbled upon one of the most notorious medical experiments in U.S. history: 399 black men with syphilis went untreated so scientists could study how the disease ravages the body. NPR's Alex Chadwick reports for Morning Edition.
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Remembering Tuskegee

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Remembering Tuskegee

Remembering Tuskegee

Remembering Tuskegee

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147234/147234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some 30 years ago, a public health investigator overheard a story about a doctor being reprimanded for treating an elderly black man with syphilis. The investigator had stumbled upon one of the most notorious medical experiments in U.S. history: 399 black men with syphilis went untreated so scientists could study how the disease ravages the body. NPR's Alex Chadwick reports for Morning Edition.

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