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Afghan Aid

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Afghan Aid

Afghan Aid

Afghan Aid

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148010/148010" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

After the fall of the Taliban, international donors pledged more than $4 billion to help rebuild a crumbling Afghanistan. Much of the aid came quickly at first, and emergency food and shelter helped millions of Afghans make it through the brutal winter. But now, many of these short-term needs have been met, and some Afghan officials are wondering why long-term projects, such as roads and irrigation repair, are slow to start. In part two of her series "Recreating Afghanistan," guest host Renee Montagne examines why aid to Afghanistan has not had a more visible effect.

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