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'Spam'

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'Spam'

'Spam'

'Spam'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148399/148399" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Our segment on "spam" begins with Jason Catlett, head of Junkbusters Corporation, which is a privacy advocacy firm. He talks about how spam works, how it makes its way around the world and why it's successful. Then we talk to Alan Ralsky, director of Creative Marketing Zone. Many people call him a "spammer," but he calls himself a "commercial e-mailer." He believes he is simply promoting free enterprise. Anti-spammers call him with death threats. Finally in this segment, NPR's Larry Abramson reports on existing state laws concerning unsolicited commercial email. (12:00)

Anti-spam links heard in this report:
Federal Trade Commission: Spam E-Mail

Junkbusters

SpamCon Foundation

Mail Abuse Prevention System

Coalition Against Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail

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