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ATMs to Adapt Voice Technology

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ATMs to Adapt Voice Technology

Technology

ATMs to Adapt Voice Technology

ATMs to Adapt Voice Technology

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As the Automated Teller Machine celebrates its 40th anniversary this week, a company that owns about 24,000 ATMs says it will make machines easier for the blind to use. Many of them will offer voice-guided technology.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

This week the automated teller machine, the ATM, celebrated its 40th birthday, and with that an innovation. A company that owns about 24,000 ATMs says it will make machines easier for the blind to use. While ATMs have long had Braille buttons, now many of them will offer voice-guided technology. Simply plug headphones into a jack and the kind voice of the machine will talk you through the process of getting cash.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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