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Italy Law

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Italy Law

Italy Law

Italy Law

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1150591/150591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports from Rome, where the lower house of Italy's parliament today is debating a law that critics say is aimed at keeping Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi out of jail. Berlusconi, Italy's richest man, is on trial for corruption. The proposed legislation would allow defendants (like him) to have their cases moved to another court if they have a "legitimate suspicion" that the judges are biased against them. The bill has already passed through the Italian senate, and the lower house is expected to endorse it as well.

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