Iditarod Race Charts a New Course For the first time in its 31-year history, weather has necessitated changing the course of Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Due to a lack of snow in Anchorage --- the race's traditional starting point -- mushers and dogs will stage a ceremonial start on March 1st for the media and fans. The real race will begin two days later -- and 400 miles away -- in Fairbanks. Alaska Public Radio's Ellen Lockyer joins Melinda Penkava to explain why the course change means both good and bad news for race participants.

Guest:

Ellen Lockyer
*Reporter/Producer for the Alaska Public Radio Network
*Will be covering this year's Iditarod
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Iditarod Race Charts a New Course

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Iditarod Race Charts a New Course

Iditarod Race Charts a New Course

Iditarod Race Charts a New Course

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1160552/1160553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

For the first time in its 31-year history, weather has necessitated changing the course of Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Due to a lack of snow in Anchorage —- the race's traditional starting point — mushers and dogs will stage a ceremonial start on March 1st for the media and fans. The real race will begin two days later — and 400 miles away — in Fairbanks. Alaska Public Radio's Ellen Lockyer joins Melinda Penkava to explain why the course change means both good and bad news for race participants.

Guest:

Ellen Lockyer
*Reporter/Producer for the Alaska Public Radio Network
*Will be covering this year's Iditarod