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The First Pumpkin Pie

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The First Pumpkin Pie

The First Pumpkin Pie

The First Pumpkin Pie

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1161537/1161538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The first farmers in the New World may have lived in the lowlands of Ecuador, not the highlands of Meso-America, according to a new study in Science magazine. As NPR's Eric Niiler reports, researchers came to this conclusion after studying microscopic crystals of fruit rinds. Modern varieties of one of these species yield the dense golden flesh used in pumpkin pies.

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