'Cool Globes': Art Promotes Action Against Warming

'Listen to Our Children' globe i

This globe, called "Listen to Our Children," is by artists Emily Abrams, John Santoro and Arthur Santoro. Cheryl Corley, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Cheryl Corley, NPR
'Listen to Our Children' globe

This globe, called "Listen to Our Children," is by artists Emily Abrams, John Santoro and Arthur Santoro.

Cheryl Corley, NPR
'Water Efficiency: World on Fire' globe i

Artist Ginny Sykes' globe is called "Water Efficiency: World on Fire." Cheryl Corley, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Cheryl Corley, NPR
'Water Efficiency: World on Fire' globe

Artist Ginny Sykes' globe is called "Water Efficiency: World on Fire."

Cheryl Corley, NPR
Kate Tully's globe is called 'CO2 Breakthrough: Plant a Tree.' i

Kate Tully's globe is called "CO2 Breakthrough: Plant a Tree." Cheryl Corley, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Cheryl Corley, NPR
Kate Tully's globe is called 'CO2 Breakthrough: Plant a Tree.'

Kate Tully's globe is called "CO2 Breakthrough: Plant a Tree."

Cheryl Corley, NPR

Think global warming and then think fun. It's not such an odd juxtaposition. At least that's the thinking behind the latest public art project in Chicago called "Cool Globes: Hot Ideas for a Cooler Planet."

Environmental activist and founder Wendy Abrams says former Vice President Al Gore's movie, An Inconvenient Truth, helped raise awareness of climate change. The Cool Globes exhibit is designed to inspire individuals and organizations to take action against global warning.

Artists from around the world used a variety of materials to transform more than 120 plain, white spheres into sculpted globes. Each suggests steps that can be taken to combat global warming.

One globe, called "Plant a Tree," asks people to do just that to fight carbon dioxide emissions.

Tiny racecars adorn another globe. "Race to Save the Planet" urges people to recycle, reuse and reduce. There are globes calling for water conservation, an increase in the use of wind power, for more hybrid cars, and for more walking than driving.

The globes, 5 feet in diameter, will be on display along Chicago's lakefront through September. In addition to the lakefront display, there are 200 mini-globes in other locations around the city.

Organizers are also asking people to commit to making five lifestyle changes out of a list of 125 suggestions at the project's Web site. At the end of the summer, a raffle will be held to award a hybrid vehicle, a bicycle or running shoes to pledge participants.

The globes will be auctioned off in the fall to fund environmental organizations for schoolchildren.

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