Violence at Red Mosque Rattles Pakistan

A group of Pakistani radical Islamic students after surrendering to authorities. i i

A group of Pakistani radical Islamic students of The Red Mosque sit on the ground near the mosque in Islamabad after surrendering to authorities. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images
A group of Pakistani radical Islamic students after surrendering to authorities.

A group of Pakistani radical Islamic students of The Red Mosque sit on the ground near the mosque in Islamabad after surrendering to authorities.

Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

A standoff follows a bloody encounter between Pakistani security forces and militant Islamic students at the Red Mosque in Islamabad. A Taliban-style movement headquartered in the mosque, drawing on thousands of students, wants to impose strict Islamic law in Pakistan's capital.

Griff Witte, a Washington Post reporter in Islamabad, says a "fairly large number" of students have now complied with government calls to surrender. Red Mosque leaders are finding some support from clerics around Pakistan and there are concerns that the violence might spread. Witte discusses the situation at the mosque with John Ydstie.

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