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Commuted Sentence Ends Libby Controversy

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Commuted Sentence Ends Libby Controversy

U.S.

Commuted Sentence Ends Libby Controversy

Commuted Sentence Ends Libby Controversy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11734804/11734808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Bush's decision to commute the sentence of former White House aide, I. Scooter Libby, this week ended a four-year controversy.

It all started in July 2003 when longtime syndicated columnist Robert Novak revealed the identity of a CIA operative, Valerie Plame. Discovering who leaked that sensitive information — an illegal act — turned into a lengthy criminal investigation. It ended when Scooter Libby was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail.

After Libby's sentencing, Novak called on Mr. Bush to pardon Scooter Libby.

Novak talks to Alex Cohen.