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Chinese Regulators Say Goods Substandard

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Chinese Regulators Say Goods Substandard

World

Chinese Regulators Say Goods Substandard

Chinese Regulators Say Goods Substandard

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  • Transcript

Chinese regulators say nearly a fifth of the food and consumer products sold in China are substandard. China's state media said the government will step up controls on dental-care products, following the alarm over toothpaste that contains a chemical found in antifreeze. But officials stress that most Chinese products are safe.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our business news begins with a report that many Chinese products are tainted.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Chinese regulators said yesterday that nearly a fifth of the food and consumer products sold in China are substandard. That admission comes as Chinese exports are increasingly being scrutinized in the U.S. Authorities in the U.S. have turned away a long list of Chinese goods, from pet food to seafood to toxic toothpaste. China's state media reported yesterday that the government will step up controls on dental-care products, following the alarm over toothpaste that contains a chemical found in antifreeze. But Chinese officials stress that most Chinese products are safe.

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