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French Winemakers Urge India, China to Drink
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French Winemakers Urge India, China to Drink

Business

French Winemakers Urge India, China to Drink

French Winemakers Urge India, China to Drink
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Some French winemakers are turning to China and India to convince those countries to develop a taste for wine as European demand dwindles. The market for wine in India is growing by at least 30 percent a year. Of course, the populations are huge in India and China.

JOHN YDSTIE, host:

The EU says millions of dollars are wasted every year on unsold European wines, so our last word in business today is the really new markets for wine. Some French winemakers are turning to China and India. At this year's trade show in Bordeaux, winemakers tried to convince those countries to develop a taste for the stuff.

The market for wine in India is growing by at least 30 percent a year. That's exciting to European winemakers, because demand is dwindling there. Of course, the populations are huge in India and China. So if you work out how much wine each person drinks, it comes to about a teaspoon a year.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm John Ydstie.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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