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DNA Structure Anniversary

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DNA Structure Anniversary

DNA Structure Anniversary

DNA Structure Anniversary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1178491/1178492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fifty years ago today, Francis Crick told patrons of the Eagle Pub in Cambridge, England, that he and James Watson had "found the secret of life." That secret — the structure of DNA — would lead to a revolution in biology. Join host Ira Flatow and guests for a look back at the discovery, and at what it has meant to science and to the world.

Guests:

Victor McElheny

*Author, Watson and DNA:Making a Scientific Revolution, (Perseus, 2003), Cambridge, Mass.

Kathy Hudson, Ph.D.

*Director, Genetics and Public Policy Center, Berman Bioethics Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.

David Baltimore

*1975 Nobel Laureate in Biology or Medicine, President of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.