Old Phone Number Still a Paris Party Line

A telephone company assigned Paris Hilton's old phone number to a college student in Los Angeles. Shira Barlow has been getting a lot of invites in Paris' name; she plans on keeping the number.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Coming up, will Anthony Riley sing "Philadelphia Freedom"? But first:

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SIMON: Shira Barlow of Los Angeles was given a wrong number for her new cell phone and she is delighted. Ms. Barlow was out with some friends on Valentine's Day when her cell phone fell out of her back pocket and into a toilet. Ha? I guess that happens. The cell phone carrier gave her a new number. Phone companies have been re-assigning old numbers so they don't have to keep splitting area codes.

Shira Barlow's new old number, it turns out, once belonged to Paris Hilton. Boy, has she been getting some calls, invitations to parties, romantic 3Ds and text messages of support for her imprison.

Shira Barlow is not in prison. She's a UCLA student. And rather than explain that she has Ms. Hilton's old number but isn't, in fact, Paris Hilton, Shira Barlow just sends a message back. Thanks for your support.

Shira Barlow told the Associated Press this week that she has no intention of asking the phone company for a new number. So far she likes getting Paris Hilton's phone calls. And while Paris Hilton is still on probation, she might prefer getting Shira Barlow's.

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