Live Earth: The Music and the Message

Dave Matthews performs i i

hide captionDave Matthews performs during the Live Earth concert at Giants Stadium, July 7, 2007. It was among multiple concerts held around the world to promote awareness of global warming.

Evan Agostini/Getty Images
Dave Matthews performs

Dave Matthews performs during the Live Earth concert at Giants Stadium, July 7, 2007. It was among multiple concerts held around the world to promote awareness of global warming.

Evan Agostini/Getty Images

All Songs Considered

Live Earth held its climactic event Saturday night outside New York City, ending a 24-hour series of concerts, organized by former Vice President Al Gore to fight global warming. From China, to England, to Brazil, big-name musicians took to the stage in what organizers called the largest event of its kind in history.

For many who attended one of the concerts at Giants Stadium in New Jersey, the event was more about beer and music than the environment. But some of the performers said they hoped the audience at least got the message of the day.

Cara Muller, who was celebrating the day with new friends outside the stadium, said she didn't sign Gore's pledge to personally help fight global warming. But she noted that she and a handful of other people carpooled to the concert.

Muller, who's pursuing her masters degree in education in Pennsylvania, said she is into Gore's cause and the concert will promote awareness of the cause.

Chris Lamanna, who was also waiting to get into the stadium, said he came for the music.

"I think it's a good idea," he said. "I know how the money is going towards the environment. But all these people are coming here for the music. Everyone's here to have a good time. That's what we're doing. We can kill two birds with one stone — music, environment.

Performer Dave Matthews told reporters that he's using cloth diapers for his new baby. He added that people shouldn't expect a miracle from these concerts.

"I'm not a scientist," Matthews said. "I'm not saying we can save the planet. But we might as well grab for straws before we go down, you know?"

When singer John Mayer came off the stage, he was asked if the crowd was there to help clean the environment, or just rock.

"What you're really talking about is the placement of an idea inside of a rock show," he said. "And of course rock is going to win out. You think people would rather you read off a hundred simple things you can change in your house, or play a rock song?"

But even if people came for the music, Mayer said, many left with a message.

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