Police Departments Consider Videotaping Interrogations Many police departments across the country begin videotaping interrogations of murder suspects. Supporters say videotaping protects suspects' rights and safety while preventing coerced confessions; others argue it compromises investigations and changes how police do their work. NPR's David Schaper reports.
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Police Departments Consider Videotaping Interrogations

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Police Departments Consider Videotaping Interrogations

Police Departments Consider Videotaping Interrogations

Police Departments Consider Videotaping Interrogations

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1182242/1182243" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Many police departments across the country begin videotaping interrogations of murder suspects. Supporters say videotaping protects suspects' rights and safety while preventing coerced confessions; others argue it compromises investigations and changes how police do their work. NPR's David Schaper reports.