Many Victims Don't Report Crime NPR's Libby Lewis reports on the Justice Department study that shows victims don't report violent crimes about half the time. The reasons could involve embarrassment, fear or frustration -- plus the fact that 40 percent of violent crimes are committed by someone known to the victim.
NPR logo

Many Victims Don't Report Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1188140/1188141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Many Victims Don't Report Crime

Many Victims Don't Report Crime

Many Victims Don't Report Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1188140/1188141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Libby Lewis reports on the Justice Department study that shows victims don't report violent crimes about half the time. The reasons could involve embarrassment, fear or frustration — plus the fact that 40 percent of violent crimes are committed by someone known to the victim.