Security Contractor Lives Life on Edge in Iraq

Scott Schneider i i

hide captionScott Schneider has spent the last three and a half years working for various private security firms in Iraq.

Courtesy of Scott Schneider
Scott Schneider

Scott Schneider has spent the last three and a half years working for various private security firms in Iraq.

Courtesy of Scott Schneider

Scott Schneider has spent the last three and a half years working for various private security firms in Iraq. He returned home to Ohio for a few weeks in June and returned to Iraq on July 6.

As a part of our weeklong series on recent returnees from Iraq, Schneider tells Michele Norris that he is likely to be attacked every time he's out on the job, providing security for traveling convoys.

The attacks, he says, range from small-arms fire meant to harass or annoy to all-out assaults where the attackers are trying to take the convoy or kidnap people.

"You've got to keep your guard up the whole time. You're on edge the whole time you're in Iraq, traveling the roads," Schneider says.

During his time in Iraq, Schneider says he has buried four colleagues. Another five remain missing after being kidnapped in November 2006.

Work at private security firms can be quite lucrative. But Schneider says that's not the only reason he does the job: patriotism and the hope that he can help another country motivated him.

"The money might get you there, but the money doesn't keep you. In a war zone or a hostile environment, there's got to be more than just the dollar signs," Schneider says.

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