England's Courts Drop Wigs From New Dress Code After almost four centuries, England's lawyers and judges working in non-criminal courts may shed their ceremonial wigs. The wigs were criticized for being expensive, not to mention uncomfortable. The few who did like them say they provided anonymity and an air of authority.
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England's Courts Drop Wigs From New Dress Code

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England's Courts Drop Wigs From New Dress Code

England's Courts Drop Wigs From New Dress Code

England's Courts Drop Wigs From New Dress Code

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11945391/11945392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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After almost four centuries, England's lawyers and judges working in non-criminal courts may shed their ceremonial wigs. The wigs were criticized for being expensive, not to mention uncomfortable. The few who did like them say they provided anonymity and an air of authority.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

The wigs have come off. After almost four centuries, England's lawyers and judges working in non-criminal courts may shed their ceremonial wig. With the cost as high as $3,000, the heavy horsehair wigs had been criticized for being expensive, not to mention uncomfortable. The few who did like them said they provided anonymity and an air of authority. The tradition survives in criminal courts where judges will still don the wigs.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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