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Panama Model

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Panama Model

Panama Model

Panama Model

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196174/1196175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Tom Gjelten reports that comparisons between an impending strike on Iraq and the 1991 Gulf conflict are inevitable, but that looking to the 1989 invasion of Panama gives a better idea of what could happen. As is the case now, U.S. forces were going in to depose one man, Manuel Noriega, and were attacking just one country. The American military also relied on its special operations forces in Panama, and will likely do the same in Iraq.

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