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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: the Rev. Stephen Kinney; Cactus Pryor; Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA); former Surgeon General Richard Carmona; Sara Taylor; Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT); Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV); President George W. Bush; Rep. John Lewis (D - GA); Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC); Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff; U.S. Ambassador to North Korea Christopher Hill.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen. And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Reverend STEPHEN KINNEY (Former Rector, St. Barnabas Episcopal Church): Lady Bird saw the world through a pure heart that awakened her to see beauty wherever and whenever it appeared.

Mr. CACTUS PRYOR (Radio Broadcaster; Author): I always thought that perhaps the most important words spoken in the Johnson White House was Lady Bird saying, now Lyndon, now Lyndon.

Representative HENRY WAXMAN (Democrat, California): Political interference is compromising the independence of the Office of the Surgeon General. What was the interference? Do they tell you, you can't talk about it? Did they review your speeches? Did they edit speeches and remarks to the press - edit reports? What was the way in which you were interfered?

Dr. RICHARD CARMONA (Former Surgeon General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services): All of the above, sir.

Ms. SARA TAYLOR (Former Deputy Assistant to President George W. Bush): In light of the president's direction, I will answer faithfully those questions that are appropriate for a private citizen to answer while also doing my best to respect the president's directive that his staff's communications be privileged.

Senator PATRICK LEAHY (Democrat, Vermont): Makes us ask the question, what is the White House trying to hide? And why would it - it appeared Ms. Taylor is testifying if, as her lawyer says, she was just cooperating.

Senator HARRY REID (Democrat, Nevada): The report from the president confirms what many had suspected, the war in Iraq is headed in a dangerous direction -and the wrong direction, of course. The Iraqi government has not met a single political benchmark in its entirety.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Those of us who believe the battle in Iraq can and must be won see the satisfactory performance on several of the security benchmarks as a cause for optimism.

Representative JOHN LEWIS (Democrat, Georgia): One more death is one too many. This war is not worthy of another drop of human blood.

Senator LINDSEY GRAHAM (Republican, South Carolina): Al-Qaida's on the run, wreaking havoc. But they're wreaking havoc on the run. They're not consolidating their power. This is literally working. Wait till September and we'll hear from the general who's brought about a new way of doing business and see if it makes sense to you. Don't undercut him.

Secretary MICHAEL CHERTOFF (U.S. Department of Homeland Security): All these things give me a, kind of, a gut feeling that we are in a period of - not of us to have a specific threat, you know, that I have in mind right now. But then we are entering a period of increased vulnerability.

Mr. CHRISTOPHER HILL (U.S. Ambassador to North Korea): What is a big issue is to take this step, the essential step of shutting down Yongbyon and using that step as a means to get - to take further steps and further steps aiming at our ultimate destination, which is complete denuclearization.

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