Tina Brown's 'Beast'-ly Reading List: Nov. 10 Edition Host Steve Inskeep invites the editor of The Daily Beast back into the NPR studios for another installment of Word of Mouth. Brown's picks this week: articles on a budding media celebrity, on the possibility of "fuzzy math" in foreign policy, and on whether the Internet is killing storytelling. Plus: the "raw and compelling" story of a Harlem girl.
NPR logo

Tina Brown's 'Beast'-ly Reading List: Nov. 10 Edition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120257053/120266993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Tina Brown's 'Beast'-ly Reading List: Nov. 10 Edition

Tina Brown's 'Beast'-ly Reading List: Nov. 10 Edition

Tina Brown's 'Beast'-ly Reading List: Nov. 10 Edition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120257053/120266993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gen. Stanley McChrystal: Did he use "fuzzy math" to sell his Afghanistan strategy? Leslie Gelb says it sure looks like it. Jim Watson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/Getty Images

Gen. Stanley McChrystal: Did he use "fuzzy math" to sell his Afghanistan strategy? Leslie Gelb says it sure looks like it.

Jim Watson/Getty Images

For the regular Morning Edition feature Word of Mouth, Daily Beast editor in chief Tina Brown stopped by NPR's Washington studios again to brief Steve Inskeep on the reading that's been occupying her attention. Her latest list:

  • Push, the 1996 novel that inspired the new movie Precious; Brown says it's "raw, and it's compelling," the tale of an abused teen, long accustomed to thinking of herself as a nothing, who learns otherwise.
  • A Gabriel Sherman profile of Andrew Ross Sorkin, a star New York Times reporter whose new book takes readers inside the Wall Street meltdown — and whose high-wire reportage has generated a certain amount of controversy and jealousy among his colleagues at the Times.
  • An argument from policy guru Leslie Gelb — published at Brown's own Daily Beast site — about whether Gen. Stanley McChrystal employed "fuzzy math" in his argument about the troop levels and timings necessary to implement his counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan.