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Intel, AMD Reach Settlement
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Intel, AMD Reach Settlement

Business

Intel, AMD Reach Settlement

Intel, AMD Reach Settlement
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Computer chip giant Intel said it will pay $1.25 billion to its rival AMD to settle two decades of disputes between the two companies. Intel and AMD sell nearly all the world's microprocessors, though Intel controls about 80 percent of the market. AMD has long accused Intel of using illegal methods to dominate the market, including paying computer makers to use its chips. Intel denies wrongdoing.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business starts with a truce in the chip wars.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Computer chip giant Intel has agreed to a settlement with rival AMD. Intel will be paying out one and a quarter billion dollars. The move comes after years of disputes between the two chip makers, who together sell nearly all the world's microprocessors. AMD has long accused Intel of using illegal tactics to dominate the market.

It alleges Intel has paid computer makers to use its chips and in some instances threatened them.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Intel has always maintained it hasnt done anything wrong but AMD's complaints have prompted anti-trust lawsuits and penalties against Intel from regulators in Europe and Asia. And last week, New York's attorney general filed a lawsuit accusing Intel of using threats and collusion to dominate the chip market.

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