Cinematographer Gordon Willis, Setting the Scene

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Gordon Willis i

Gordon Willis has been in the film business for over 30 years. He received Oscar nominations for his work on The Godfather Part III and Woody Allen's Zelig. Douglas Kirkland hide caption

itoggle caption Douglas Kirkland
Gordon Willis

Gordon Willis has been in the film business for over 30 years. He received Oscar nominations for his work on The Godfather Part III and Woody Allen's Zelig.

Douglas Kirkland

Cinematographer Gordon Willis has an impressive resume. He's the creative eye behind eight of Woody Allen's most iconic films (including Annie Hall and Manhattan), to say nothing of the Godfather trilogy and All The President's Men.

Willis's images helped set the style for 1970s cinematography, and he's often hailed for his ability to set a scene with light and color. This fall, he's being awarded an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement.

"Light means a lot to me in life," Willis told Fresh Air host Terry Gross in a 2002 interview. "I hate to be in rooms that don't have dimension and light."

We tip our hat in his direction with a rebroadcast of that 2002 conversation about his life behind the lens.

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