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Letters: Berlin Wall, Gay Rights, Sesame Street
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Letters: Berlin Wall, Gay Rights, Sesame Street

From Our Listeners

Letters: Berlin Wall, Gay Rights, Sesame Street

Letters: Berlin Wall, Gay Rights, Sesame Street
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Listeners comment on past shows, including the fall of the Berlin Wall and the state of gay rights where they live. Some share fond memories of growing up with Sesame Street, and many wrote in to praise NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton's reporting from Africa.

REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

It's Tuesday, the day we read from your emails and Web comments. Our discussion about the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall brought this comment from Eric in Ohio: Generation X has an interesting perspective on this. We, as a generation, lived almost exactly half our lives during the Cold War era and half our lives in the post-Cold War era. We were a cynical generation and viewed all governments with suspicion. We also grew up in the shadow of the bomb. Everyone I knew in my generation had a plan, either to try to survive nuclear war or to ensure we would die in the initial blast and not have to live through the horrors of nuclear winter.

When Bishop Gene Robinson joined us, we asked you to tell us what was happening with regard to gay rights where you live. Ruth in Ohio sent this email: I was so excited this week to learn of a decision announced at our diocese and convention last weekend. Bishop Breidenthal announced that our diocese would lift the prohibition on the blessing of same-sex unions, effective Easter 2010. This is wonderful news. There are many gay and lesbian couples in our diocese for whom this will be such a gift. I know this will not be welcome news to all, yet I pray that all will be able to come together in shared faith to continue to follow the gospel with our eyes on Christ.

Deb in North Carolina sent us this message when she heard our conversation with Scott Fahlman about emoticons and abbreviations in email. A friend thought LOL meant lots of love. The only problem was she was a pastoral counselor and would email some of her congregants: I'm so sorry about your problem, death in the family, illness, et cetera. LOL. When we told her it meant laugh out loud, she about died of mortification and we all laughed ourselves silly.

Along the same lines, many of you had fond memories about growing up with "Sesame Street" and Helen Svoboda Barber(ph) in Ohio wanted to share this story. When I was little, my mom asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I replied: a go-go dancer. My mom was mortified and asked where I learned about go-go dancers. On "Sesame Street," they used a go-go dancer to teach about the letter G. I eventually grew up to be an Episcopal priest.

And finally, many, many of you wrote in to tell us how much you enjoy hearing NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton's reports from Africa, and also to say how much you enjoy her outcue. So, for all of you Ofeibea fans out there, here she is once more.

OFEIBEA QUIST-ARCTON: Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, NPR News, Dakar.

ROBERTS: If you have comments, questions or corrections for us, the best way to reach us is by email. The address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from and give us some help on how to pronounce your name.

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