Business

Hershey, Ferrero Consider Bid For Cadbury

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British chocolate maker Cadbury is trying to fend off a hostile takeover by the American food company Kraft. Hershey and Ferrero International say they're considering a possible offer for Cadbury too. The move raises the possibility of a takeover battle.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

NPR's business news starts with a possible new bid for Cadbury.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The drama continues in the global chocolate industry. As you might have heard, the American food company Kraft is trying to buy the British chocolate maker Cadbury. Cadbury is trying to fend off that takeover. Now another U.S. company, the chocolate maker Hershey, may bid for Cadbury. Hershey says it's considering making an offer for the British company. To come up with a bid that can compete with Kraft's $16 billion proposal, Hershey may team up with a European chocolate maker, Ferrero. Ferrero makes Tic Tacs, in addition to chocolate products. No offer is official. The companies are just talking.

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