Slow Down; Enjoy The Ride

Fred C. Lewis i i

hide captionFred C. Lewis taught music in public schools and served in the Navy for 12 years. He currently lives in Virginia with his lovely wife and dog.

Courtesy Fred C. Lewis
Fred C. Lewis

Fred C. Lewis taught music in public schools and served in the Navy for 12 years. He currently lives in Virginia with his lovely wife and dog.

Courtesy Fred C. Lewis
'What's Driving You Crazy?' promo

We gave our listeners 250 words to tell us about their gripes with the road. We picked the eight best essays, and we unveil them one by one this week.

I first noticed Zor in my rearview mirror, just as I began my journey home at the beginning of rush hour.

I called her "Zor." Not for a bird or Greek god, but because those were the first three letters of her license plate. It's how I remember vehicles that irritate me; if I'm ever asked by police or an evening news crew, I can give at least a partial identification and maybe collect the lock-you-up reward.

It was two minutes after the HOV lanes became restricted, so the outside lanes filled quickly with impatient drivers thinking they could still beat the system.

I'm not one of them. I quite like the slow commute; it's my time to listen to NPR's All Things Considered without interruption.

But Zor dodged past, looking annoyed, as if I caused her need for speed.

I kept with the flow, not tailgating, not lagging behind, either. Zor, up ahead, wove between lanes, finally getting stuck in the right-hand side. You can go only so fast at this time of day; don't they get it?

The show was almost over; I was almost home. I forgot about Zor, until I saw her behind me while stopped at a light. She still looked annoyed. She rushed to get to the same place I ambled to.

She turned left into the parking lot of the DMV and I thought, "Her rush hour has only begun."

Fred C. Lewis taught music in public schools and served in the Navy for 12 years. He currently lives in Virginia with his lovely wife and dog.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: