When Emotions Go Into Overdrive

Alissa Corby i i

Alissa Corby is a 24-year-old art education graduate student and AmeriCorps tutor living in Buffalo, N.Y. Courtesy of Alissa Corby hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Alissa Corby
Alissa Corby

Alissa Corby is a 24-year-old art education graduate student and AmeriCorps tutor living in Buffalo, N.Y.

Courtesy of Alissa Corby
'What's Driving You Crazy?' promo

We gave our listeners 250 words to tell us about their gripes with the road. We picked the eight best essays, and we unveil them one by one this week.

A robot is easy to get angry at.

It feels like on the road, we forget there are human beings behind the wheel. It feels like we think a car has headlights for eyes, and a toothy grille for a grin.

But we are all just people and because of this sometimes unfortunate fact, we all make mistakes. When we are stressed and our blood is pumping, our bodies respond by going through a whole range of emotions. Human expression is integral in this equation, because without it, we can not read the apology or sincerity in another driver's eyes.

For this reason, I suggest that we all try to make more eye contact on the road. Yes, sometimes it'll be aggressive, but I think it always surprises another driver when I smile at them instead of scowl with anger.

I have even found myself in the situation of yelling at a driver when they made an honest and harmless mistake. They stopped, looked at me and apologized and I felt horrible for yelling at them after that. I realized that my emotions had got the best of me.

Alissa Corby is a 24-year-old art education graduate student and AmeriCorps tutor living in Buffalo, N.Y.

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