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Your Letters: Mammograms, Adoption, Bonamassa

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Your Letters: Mammograms, Adoption, Bonamassa

From Our Listeners

Your Letters: Mammograms, Adoption, Bonamassa

Your Letters: Mammograms, Adoption, Bonamassa

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  • Transcript

Host Scott Simon reads listeners' letters about mammograms, adoption and blues man Joe Bonamassa.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPEWRITER)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: In my essay last week on new guidelines for mammograms, I said that I'd been told by women that they were painful and humiliating tests. Most men, myself included - maybe even Daniel Craig included - would cringe to have a mammogram. Diane Grenell(ph) of Heath, Massachusetts, writes: Although I like the main message of your comment, you do women who have never had a mammogram a disservice by possibly scaring them off by saying painful and humiliating. A mammogram may be slightly uncomfortable for a few seconds, but far easier than going to the dentist.

SIMON: I've seen four first cousins die of breast cancer, and that's not enough to make me submit to an experience that I'm sure is hard for any man to understand. Having one of your most tender body parts painfully wrenched and smashed between two cold pieces of a machine, then to hear that you need to undergo it a second time a week later because of something unclear, and then to wait in agony for results for a week or more while you wonder if your child will grow up motherless. It's an annual trauma, and I don't use that word lightly.

L: I was choking up while listening to Scott's interview with his daughte and reflecting on my own experience with my adopted daughter from Chile. Veronica will be 19 in a few days, and she has been such a blessing and one of the greatest gifts in my life.

A: I'm also a daughter raised by a loving man with whom I share no direct biological connection. I always laugh when people tell me they never realized he isn't my real father, as if sharing DNA was the only true foundation for a loving relationship between parent and child.

A: Wow, thanks so much for interviewing Smoking Joe Bonamassa, and thanks for letting him sing and play the whole number on air. It was very high quality, very enjoyable. I loved the passion.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FURTHER ON UP THE ROAD ")

SIMON: (Singing) Further on up the road...

SIMON: Like you to share your passion. Go to our Web site, npr.org, and click on Contact Us, where you can post your thoughts in the comments section on each story. You can also find me on Twitter - nprscottsimon - all one word. Or tweet the rest of the WEEKEND EDITION staff at nprweekend - all one word. And we're on Facebook, facebook.com/nprweekend.

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