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Military Strategy

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Military Strategy

Military Strategy

Military Strategy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1209502/1209503" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Career military officers and civilian planners compromised when planning war strategy for Iraq. The result is a mix of heavy armor, high-tech air attacks and special operations missions. However, critics are taking both groups to task, wondering why there don't seem to be enough troops available to protect supply lines or deal with irregular Iraqi fighters. Join us for a conversation about the evolution of war strategy.

Guests:

Ivan Watson
*NPR Reporter in northern Iraq

Tom Gjelten
*NPR's National Security Correspondent

Lt. Col. Ralph Peters (Army, Ret.)
*Author of Beyond Terror: Strategy in a Changing World (Stackpole Books, 2002)
*Had an op-ed in Tuesday, Mar. 25 edition of The Washington Post, "Shock, Awe and Overconfidence"

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