NPR logo
Listeners Recall First Time On The Internet
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120963356/120963349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Listeners Recall First Time On The Internet

Listeners Recall First Time On The Internet

Listeners Recall First Time On The Internet
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120963356/120963349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the occasional series to mark the 40th anniversary of the Internet, listeners share stories about their first e-mail, Web page and instant message. One listener recalls her first foray into a chat room, another remembers her seventh grade computer class, and a third relives connecting to the Internet from Papua New Guinea.

(Soundbite of music)

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

And continuing on the topic of technology and relationships. Many of us have a longstanding romance with this thing called the Internet. Well, this year marks the 40th anniversary of the Internet. And as part of our occasional series, The Net at 40, we asked you to tell us about your first time, your first email, your first Web page, and of course, your first instant message.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Amanda Lynn(ph) of Little Rock, Arkansas, was sitting in front of her friend's Mac Classic. The year was 1992. She logged on for the very first time with a trial disk from America Online.

Ms. AMANDA LYNN: We were just absolutely giddy with anticipation hearing the hiss and the boing-boing and the dial-up connecting us to the Internet.

NORRIS: And once Lynn and her friend got on, they headed straight for the chat rooms.

Ms. LYNN: We spent the next several hours talking to a guy who was in north Little Rock, Arkansas, which is literally 12 miles away from my apartment.

BLOCK: Emily Kentsmith(ph) of Columbus, Ohio, remembers hearing those same hissing sounds in her seventh-grade computer class. It was 1990. And her teacher dialed into the National Weather Service. After several minutes of waiting, he proudly printed out the day's forecast.

Ms. EMILY KENTSMITH: I remember thinking, it seems like a really long drawn out way to find out what the forecast is because I could just watch the news in the morning or pick up a newspaper or something and find it, so I don't think that this ever going to really, you know, turn out to be anything big.

NORRIS: Well, it did turn out to be a pretty big transition for Sheila Clairee(ph) who first logged on in April of 1999. After two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in a remote part of Papua New Guinea, she was having a hard time communicating with her family. She finally got through.

Ms. SHEILA CLAIREE: I sent my mom an email and it was just so ironic because I'd had so many, you know, moments when I've been sitting at the phone, like, for two hours on end, redialing, trying to get through to her. And I hit the send button (unintelligible) a very simple message to my mom: Hi. I'm fine. Leaving today. Love Sheila.

BLOCK: Thanks for sharing your Web memories with us. You can hear more of The Net at 40 series on WEEKEND ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

NORRIS: And don't forget to check out our blog, npr.org/alltech.

(Soundbite of music)

NORRIS: This is NPR, National Public Radio.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.