Tina Brown's Must-Reads: Celebrities Behaving Badly

Tiger Woods practicing golf outside his home in Windermere, Fla. i i

One day before breaking his silence over scandals in his personal life, golfer Tiger Woods practiced outside his home in Windermere, Fla. Sam Greenwood/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sam Greenwood/Getty Images
Tiger Woods practicing golf outside his home in Windermere, Fla.

One day before breaking his silence over scandals in his personal life, golfer Tiger Woods practiced outside his home in Windermere, Fla.

Sam Greenwood/Getty Images

For Morning Edition's occasional feature "Word of Mouth," Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown presents Steve Inskeep with her list of must-reads in magazines and online. This week's theme: celebrity misbehavior.

"Call Girls Out-Class Mistresses"

Brown recommends a column from her own site analyzing Tiger Woods' infidelities. Daily Beast columnist and former call girl Tracy Quan writes that Woods would have been wiser to enter into affairs with professional prostitutes than women who would grow emotionally attached to him.

"Her view is that Tiger's biggest mistake was dallying with amateurs who didn't subscribe to the call-girl code of protecting above all her client's secrecy," Brown says.

"Unless a client has behaved badly or violently, his privacy is usually respected," Quan writes in her column. "This is a line that separates professionals from amateurs."

"The Celebrity Defense"

Brown's next suggestion is a New Yorker article on Roman Polanski. Writer Jeffrey Toobin traces Polanski's trouble with the law to determine whether his fame has helped or hurt him with regard to the rape charges he has been fleeing for more than 30 years.

"He very coolly dissects the impact that celebrity has had on the vicissitudes of Polanski's whole course with the law in the last 33 years," Brown says.

In the article, Toobin argues that at first, celebrity helped Polanski's case. But fame turned against him eventually, when a photo of the director carousing with a young woman in Germany landed in the papers.

"That picture made the judge absolutely crazy," Brown says.

"He felt that Polanski was flouting the judge's authority, and that really set him a course for the second round, where, in fact, everything was really weighted against him."

"Why Kozlowski Should Get Clemency"

Finally, Brown recommends a Fortune magazine profile of Dennis Kozlowski, former CEO of Tyco, who is in prison for stealing hundreds of millions from the company.

Compared to many of the villains in the last economic meltdown, Kaplan writes, Kozlowski "looks like small fry in the sea of financial shenanigans," and he's already paid the price for his considerable greed.

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