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Researchers Solve Checkers, Once and for All

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Researchers Solve Checkers, Once and for All

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Researchers Solve Checkers, Once and for All

Researchers Solve Checkers, Once and for All

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12125923/12125924" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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After sorting through 500 billion, billion possible moves, computer scientists have created a computer program that will never lose a game of checkers. But human players need not despair: if a human plays perfectly against the computer, the game will end in a draw.

Jonathan Schaeffer, professor of computer science, University of Alberta