At Climate Conference, Hot Air Reigns

The folks at the climate conference in Denmark have two weeks set aside to discuss global warming. Satirists Bruce Kluger and David Slavin expect one clear message to come out of the meeting: talk itself is hailed as an end product.

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Now, something less serious about global warming. The folks at the climate conference in Denmark have two weeks set aside for discussions. Satirists Bruce Kluger and David Slavin expect one clear message to come out of the meeting.

Unidentified Man: We have the evidence. We have the technology. And now, we have the lung capacity. Mother Earth is ready. We can't wait any longer to do something about climate change. The time has come to talk about it. At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, thousands of the world's leading scientists and government officials have gathered to take a stand on global warming. And we are determined to discuss it even further.

That's why this year we've agreed to form three new special sub-committees to look deeper into this crisis and really talk it into the ground. Not just today or tomorrow, we are prepared to talk about global warming until hell freezes over, which, given the rise in the earth's temperature, may never happen. But that won't stop us from meeting and meeting again. When it comes to climate change, we'll talk anywhere, from the frozen tundra of Aspen to the baking sands of Cancun. Nothing will stop us, except for a cataclysmic weather event brought on by severe climate change. Now, that would be something to talk about.

Join the conversation at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, we don't just do something, we talk about it. The United Nations climate change conference, now powered exclusively by Wind.

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NORRIS: That's satire from Bruce Kluger and David Slavin.

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