Energy-Efficient Traffic Lights Can't Melt Snow Many U.S. cities have new energy efficient bulbs in their stoplights. They use 90 percent less energy, last longer and save money. But since the new bulbs don't emit heat, they don't melt snow. The Associated Press reports that dozens of car crashes have been blamed on snow-covered stoplights. Police say if lights are covered with snow, treat them like a stop sign.
NPR logo

Energy-Efficient Traffic Lights Can't Melt Snow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/121498684/121498683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Energy-Efficient Traffic Lights Can't Melt Snow

Energy-Efficient Traffic Lights Can't Melt Snow

Energy-Efficient Traffic Lights Can't Melt Snow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/121498684/121498683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many U.S. cities have new energy efficient bulbs in their stoplights. They use 90 percent less energy, last longer and save money. But since the new bulbs don't emit heat, they don't melt snow. The Associated Press reports that dozens of car crashes have been blamed on snow-covered stoplights. Police say if lights are covered with snow, treat them like a stop sign.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro. A few words now about the dark side of energy efficiency, literally. Many American cities have new energy-efficient bulbs in their stoplights. They use 90 percent less energy, last longer and save money. But since the new bulbs don't emit heat, they don't melt snow. The Associated Press reports that dozens of car crashes have been blamed on snow-covered stoplights. Police say if lights are covered with snow, treat them like a stop sign. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.