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U.S. Tracks Suspicious Sudafed Purchases

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U.S. Tracks Suspicious Sudafed Purchases

U.S.

U.S. Tracks Suspicious Sudafed Purchases

U.S. Tracks Suspicious Sudafed Purchases

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12164593/12164594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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MethCheck is a computerized tracking system the government is trying out in pharmacies. It collects customer data, and then notifies police about suspicious Sudafed purchases.

The cold medicine contains an ingredient used to make the illegal drug methamphetamine, so federal law limits Sudafed purchases to six boxes at a time. Of course, there's the risk of ensnaring innocent users.

Police in Kentucky say they have called in several customers for questioning, and found their only crime was stocking up on Sudafed for their allergies.

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