Nowell Briscoe: Archivist Of Death Revisits The Past

Nowell Briscoe has been collecting obituaries for more than 50 years. i i

Nowell Briscoe has been collecting obituaries for more than 50 years. Lu Olkowski hide caption

itoggle caption Lu Olkowski
Nowell Briscoe has been collecting obituaries for more than 50 years.

Nowell Briscoe has been collecting obituaries for more than 50 years.

Lu Olkowski

Nowell Briscoe has been collecting obituaries for more than 50 years. He started when he was 7 years old and living in Monroe, Ga., a small town outside Atlanta.

He continues to read multiple newspapers daily — and his collection grows. In one month last year, Briscoe collected more than 400 obituaries. Today, he has 30 scrapbooks and a roomful of clippings waiting to be transferred into scrapbooks.

Briscoe says he is deeply nostalgic, and his collection allows him to visit the past — and keep those who have died alive in the present. For Briscoe, it's the ultimate form of appreciating people.

Produced by Lu Olkowski. The Obituary Project was produced by Emily Botein with Posey Gruener and edited by Deborah George. Production support from Robin Wise. The Obituary Project was made possible with support from the New York State Council on the Arts.

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