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Looking Back At The Year In Science

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Looking Back At The Year In Science

Science

Looking Back At The Year In Science

Looking Back At The Year In Science

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Ira Flatow and a panel of science writers and editors discuss the top science stories of 2009, from the discovery of water on the moon to the unveiling of human ancestor Ardipithecus ramidus to public health controversies like the new mammography guidelines and the swine flu vaccine.

Guests:

Paul Raeburn, biology and medical writer, Knight Science Journalism Tracker, author forthcoming book Why Fathers Matter, New York, N.Y.

Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief, Scientific American and Scientific American Mind, president, National Association of Science Writers, New York, N.Y.

Nicholas Thompson, author, The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War, senior editor, Wired magazine, New York, N.Y.

Phil Plait, author, Death from the Skies! These are the Ways the World Will End..., author, Bad Astronomy blog for Discovery Magazine, Boulder, Colo.

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