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Parody Parade Ages 'Sesame Street' Characters

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Parody Parade Ages 'Sesame Street' Characters

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Parody Parade Ages 'Sesame Street' Characters

Parody Parade Ages 'Sesame Street' Characters

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The children's program Sesame Street is celebrating its 40th anniversary. The satirical performance at a holiday parade in Miami featured the show's characters, but they had aged. Cookie Monster was riding in a wheelchair. He had an insulin tube and a sign reading "D is for Diabetes."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with a tribute to "Sesame Street." The children's program is celebrating its 40th anniversary and got a send up at a holiday parade in Miami. The satirical performance featured "Sesame Street" characters who aged. Cookie Monster was riding in a wheelchair and had an insulin tube and a sign reading "D is for Diabetes." Ernie carried a six pack with a sign "B is for Beer" and Bert had a coming out party.

(Soundbite of song, "Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street")

Unidentified Group: (Singing) ...how to get to Sesame Street?

You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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