Landmark New York Restaurant To Change Hands

One of the most famous restaurants in New York City serves its final meal New Year's Eve. Tavern on the Green, at the edge of Central Park, opened during the Great Depression but succumbed to the recession. New management will take over, but may have to change the restaurant's name — the old owners are fighting to keep that name.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is last super.

One of the most famous restaurants in New York City serves its final meal tonight. Tavern on the Green in Central Park opened during the Great Depression but succumbed to the recession. The family that's been running the restaurant lost its operating license from the city earlier this year.

New management will take over, but may have to change the name. The old owners are fighting to keep that name, maybe use it elsewhere. It could be the most valuable thing that they have left.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

(Soundbite of song, "New York State of Mind")

Unknown Woman: (Singing) I'm in a New York state of mind. I've seen all the movie stars in their fancy cars...

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.