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Next Decade: Fashion's Future

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Next Decade: Fashion's Future

Next Decade: Fashion's Future

Next Decade: Fashion's Future

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Simon Doonan, creative director for the clothing store Barney's New York, looks to the future of fashion in the new decade.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

At the beginning of this new decade, we've been asking people to offer their predictions for 2010 and beyond. Here's Simon Doonan, the creative director for the clothing store Barney's New York.

Mr. SIMON DOONAN (Creative Director, Barney's New York): Fashion is very much a pendulum. And the last 10 years has been fairly extreme. And so, as we think about the extremes of the last 10 years then, you know, you can use those to predict the swings which would take place in the next 10 years.

So, in the last 10 years we've seen women in particular moving to a very sort of masochistic periods, where shoes became ridiculously high and very painful to wear. And women's sense of their own bodies became very masochistic, like legs never long enough, boobs never big enough, faces never Botox enough. It's been a sort of very self-critical period for women in the last 10 years.

And so, you know, as a guy, I look at that in a more objective way and think, you know, hopefully in the next year, next few years there'll be a sort of relaxing of this sort of unachievable ideal that women have been striving for. Those are my hopes. It would be nice to see women moving to a looser, more bohemian way of viewing themselves.

SHAPIRO: That's Simon Doonan, creative director for Barney's New York offering his fashion predictions on the coming decade.

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